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Abstract

Female birds store sperm in sperm storage tubules (SSTs) in the uterovaginal junction of their reproductive tract for days or weeks (depending on species) before fertilization. Sperm are transported from the SSTs to the infundibulum where fertilization occurs immediately after ovulation of each...

Author(s)
Hemmings, N.; Birkhead, T. R.; Brillard, J. P.; Froment, P.; Briere, S.
Publisher
Elsevier, New York, USA
Citation
Theriogenology, 2015, 83, 7, pp 1174-1178
Abstract

In 5 hens inseminated intravaginally with 200 × 106 spermatozoa, the largest number of spermatozoa reached the infundibulum 2 days after insemination (41.64 × 103), even though a few (0.23 × 103 per ♀) were detected there within 1 h of insemination. Only 4.09 × 103 spermatozoa were in the...

Author(s)
Brillard, J. P.
Citation
Theriogenology, 1990, 33, 5, pp 1021-1029
Abstract

A review. Recent observations in turkeys and fowls show that sperm storage in both species is a highly inefficient process. After AI, <1% of the spermatozoa inseminated are selected for transport to and enter the sperm storage tubules (SST). It has been shown that the sperm selection process is orchestrated within the vagina and not at the level of the SST. At least 2 mechanisms are involved in the selection of spermatozoa fit for sperm storage, one being mechanical (motility) and the other biochemical (sperm-vaginal mucosa interactions). Furthermore, it has been shown that sperm storage efficiency in fowls is dependent upon the logarithm of the number of spermatozoa inseminated. From a practical standpoint, inseminations performed frequently with a moderate number of spermatozoa should be more efficient than inseminations performed with higher doses at longer intervals. ...

Author(s)
Brillard, J. P.
Citation
Poultry Science, 1993, 72, 5, pp 923-928