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Abstract

Computer modeling has a long history of association with epidemiology, and has improved our understanding of the theory of disease dynamics and provided insights into wildlife disease management. A summary of badger bovine TB models and their role in decision making is presented, from a simple...

Author(s)
Smith, G. C.; Delahay, R. J.
Publisher
Frontiers Media S.A., Lausanne, Switzerland
Citation
Frontiers in Veterinary Science, 2018, 5, November, pp 276
Abstract

The behaviour of certain infected individuals within socially structured populations can have a disproportionately large effect on the spatio-temporal distribution of infection. Endemic infection with Mycobacterium bovis in European badgers (Meles meles) in Great Britain and Ireland is an important ...

Author(s)
Tomlinson, A. J.; Chambers, M. A.; Carter, S. P.; Wilson, G. J.; Smith, G. C.; McDonald, R. A.; Delahay, R. J.
Publisher
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK
Citation
Epidemiology and Infection, 2013, 141, 7, pp 1458-1466
CABI Book Chapter Info
Cover for Tuberculosis in badgers (<i xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">Meles meles</i>).

Badgers are clearly an important wildlife reservoir of M. bovis, although the extent of their contribution to infection in cattle and the appropriate means of managing transmission risks are hotly debated. This book chapter discusses the badger ecology; pathogenesis; diagnosis; epidemiology of M....

Author(s)
Chambers, M. A.; Gormley, E.; Corner, L. A. L.; Smith, G. C.; Delahay, R. J.
ISBN
2015 CABI (H ISBN 9781780643960)
Type
Book chapter
Abstract

Statistical models of epidemiology in wildlife populations usually consider diseased individuals as a single class, despite knowledge that infections progress through states of severity. Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a serious zoonotic disease threatening the UK livestock industry, but we have...

Author(s)
Graham, J.; Smith, G. C.; Delahay, R. J.; Bailey, T.; McDonald, R. A.; Hodgson, D.
Publisher
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK
Citation
Epidemiology and Infection, 2013, 141, 7, pp 1429-1436
Abstract

Demographic buffering allows populations to persist by compensating for fluctuations in vital rates, including disease-induced mortality. Using long-term data on a badger (Meles meles Linnaeus, 1758) population naturally infected with Mycobacterium bovis, we built an integrated population model to...

Author(s)
McDonald, J. L.; Bailey, T.; Delahay, R. J.; McDonald, R. A.; Smith, G. C.; Hodgson, D. J.
Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK
Citation
Ecology Letters, 2016, 19, 4, pp 443-449
Abstract

Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) causes substantial economic losses to cattle farmers and taxpayers in the British Isles. Disease management in cattle is complicated by the role of the European badger (Meles meles) as a host of the infection. Proactive, non-selective culling of badgers can reduce the...

Author(s)
Smith, G. C.; Delahay, R. J.; McDonald, R. A.; Budgey, R.
Publisher
Public Library of Sciences (PLoS), San Francisco, USA
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2016, 11, 11, pp e0167206
Abstract

Bovine tuberculosis (bTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis, continues to be a serious economic problem for the British cattle industry. The Eurasian badger (Meles meles) is partly responsible for maintenance of the disease and its transmission to cattle. Previous attempts to manage the disease by...

Author(s)
Smith, G. C.; McDonald, R. A.; Wilkinson, D.
Publisher
Public Library of Sciences (PLoS), San Francisco, USA
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2012, 7, 6, pp e39250
AbstractFull Text

Emerging infectious diseases often originate in wildlife, but the complex dynamics of wild animal populations mean that disease control is a major scientific and policy challenge. Culling and vaccination can be effective but the ecological characteristics of wild animals may confound the outcomes...

Author(s)
Smith, G. C.; Wilkinson, D.
Publisher
Julius Kühn Institut, Bundesforschungsinstitut für Kulturpflanzen, Quedlinburg, Germany
Citation
Julius-Kühn-Archiv, 2011, No.432, pp 201-202
Abstract

We analysed the incidence of cattle herd breakdowns due to bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) in relation to experimental badger culling, badger populations and farm characteristics during the Randomized Badger Culling Trial (RBCT). Mixed modelling and event history analysis were used to...

Author(s)
Mill, A. C.; Rushton, S. P.; Shirley, M. D. F.; Murray, A. W. A.; Smith, G. C.; Delahay, R. J.; McDonald, R. A.
Publisher
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK
Citation
Epidemiology and Infection, 2012, 140, 2, pp 219-230
Abstract

Wildlife is a global source of endemic and emerging infectious diseases. The control of tuberculosis (TB) in cattle in Britain and Ireland is hindered by persistent infection in wild badgers (Meles meles). Vaccination with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been shown to reduce the severity and...

Author(s)
Carter, S. P.; Chambers, M. A.; Rushton, S. P.; Shirley, M. D. F.; Schuchert, P.; Pietravalle, S.; Murray, A.; Rogers, F.; Gettinby, G.; Smith, G. C.; Delahay, R. J.; Hewinson, R. G.; McDonald, R. A.
Publisher
Public Library of Sciences (PLoS), San Francisco, USA
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2012, 7, 12, pp e49833

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