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Abstract

A variety of bivalve mollusks (phylum Mollusca, class Bivalvia) constitute a prominent commodity in fisheries and aquacultures, but are also crucial in order to preserve our ecosystem's complexity and function. Bivalve mollusks, such as clams, mussels, oysters and scallops, are relevant bred...

Author(s)
Zannella, C.; Mosca, F.; Mariani, F.; Franci, G.; Folliero, V.; Galdiero, M.; Tiscar, P. G.; Galdiero, M.
Publisher
MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland
Citation
Marine Drugs, 2017, 15, 6, pp 182
Abstract

The production of most farmed molluscs, including mussels, oysters, scallops, abalone, and clams, is heavily dependent on natural seed from the plankton. Closing the lifecycle of species in hatcheries can secure independence from wild stocks and enables long-term genetic improvement of broodstock...

Author(s)
Hollenbeck, C. M.; Johnston, I. A.
Publisher
Frontiers Media S.A., Lausanne, Switzerland
Citation
Frontiers in Genetics, 2018, 9, July, pp 253
Abstract

This article describes an inexpensive, low labour, brood-preserving, minimal space method for spawning bivalves called the bin-silo method. The components of this system are presented as well as results of trials using the bin-silo system to successfully spawn Eastern oyster, hard clam and ribbed ...

Author(s)
Landau, B. J.
Publisher
World Aquaculture Society, Baton Rouge, USA
Citation
World Aquaculture, 2014, 45, 1, pp 58-61
AbstractFull Text

Bivalve mollusc aquaculture constitutes the most valuable aquaculture industry among Pacific island countries, however it is for round pearl production from blacklip oyster Pinctada margeritifera. Large-scale commercialised fisheries or aquaculture production and export of molluscs for food is...

Author(s)
Pickering, T.; Garcia-Gomez, R.; Sobey, M.
Publisher
Organising Committee, International Conference on Molluscan Shellfish Society, Silverwater, Australia
Citation
Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Molluscan Shellfish Safety, Sydney, Australia, 17-22 March 2013, 2014, pp 10-14
Abstract

Hatcheries providing seed for bivalve mollusc aquaculture can suffer from disease outbreaks resulting in high losses of larvae. Previous research demonstrated the effectiveness of candidate probiotics Phaeobacter inhibens S4 (S4) and Bacillus pumilus RI06-95 (RI) in protecting the larvae of eastern ...

Author(s)
Sohn, S.; Lundgren, K. M.; Tammi, K.; Smolowitz, R.; Nelson, D. R.; Rowley, D. C.; Gómez-Chiarri, M.
Publisher
National Shellfisheries Association, Southampton, USA
Citation
Journal of Shellfish Research, 2016, 35, 2, pp 319-328
Abstract

This section is comprised of 52 abstracts of papers presented at the 30th Milford Aquaculture Seminar. The topics discussed include shellfish aquaculture, its effects on the environment and ecology, pollution by heavy metals, techniques employed in shellfish culture, management of aquaculture...

Author(s)
Blogoslawski, W. J.
Publisher
National Shellfisheries Association, Southampton, USA
Citation
Journal of Shellfish Research, 2010, 29, 2, pp 541-561
Abstract

Suspended culture of bivalves offers a number of advantages over beach (intertidal) culture, but is often hindered by two issues: biofouling and suboptimal shell shape. This study assessed the efficacy of two novel culture media in Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) grow-out and Manila clam (...

Author(s)
Marshall, R. D.; Dunham, A.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Aquaculture, 2013, 406/407, pp 68-78
Abstract

Bivalves, from raw oysters to steamed clams, are popular choices among seafood lovers and once limited to the coastal areas. The rapid growth of the aquaculture industry and improvement in the preservation and transport of seafood have enabled them to be readily available anywhere in the world....

Author(s)
Robledo, J. A. F.; Raghavendra Yadavalli; Allam, B.; Espinosa, E. P.; Gerdol, M.; Greco, S.; Stevick, R. J.; Gómez-Chiarri, M.; Zhang Ying; Heil, C. A.; Tracy, A. N.; Bishop-Bailey, D.; Metzger, M. J.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Developmental and Comparative Immunology, 2019, 92, pp 260-282
Abstract

Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide results in a decrease in seawater pH, a process known as "ocean acidification". The pearl oyster Pinctada fucata, the noble scallop Chlamys nobilis, and the green-lipped mussel Perna viridis are species of economic and ecological importance along the...

Author(s)
Liu WenGuang; He MaoXian
Publisher
Science Press, Beijing, China
Citation
Chinese Journal of Oceanology and Limnology, 2012, 30, 2, pp 206-211
Abstract

In order to increase production of bivalves in hatcheries and nurseries, the development of new technology and its integration into commercial bivalve hatcheries is important. Recirculation aquaculture systems (RASs) have several advantages: high densities of the species can be cultured resulting...

Author(s)
Kamermans, P.; Blanco, A.; Joaquim, S.; Matias, D.; Magnesen, T.; Nicolas, J. L.; Petton, B.; Robert, R.
Publisher
Springer, Dordrecht, Netherlands
Citation
Aquaculture International, 2016, 24, 3, pp 827-842

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