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News Article

All countries exporting animal products to EU will need to satisfy new antibiotics requirements


The European Commission want non-EU countries, exporting animals and animal products to the bloc to abide by new rules on veterinary medicines when it comes to the use of antibiotics.

The European Commission want non-EU countries, exporting animals and animal products to the bloc to abide by new rules on veterinary medicines when it comes to the use of antibiotics.

However, non-EU countries warn that this could break WTO rules as well as have severe implications on global trade.

Last month, the European Parliament reached an agreement on a regulation on veterinary medicines. A crucial aspect of the new rules is the fight against antimicrobial resistance (AMR) imposing strict measures that limit the use of antibiotics in the livestock sector.

According to this agreement, animals and products of animal origin imported from third countries will have to meet the EU requirements on antibiotics use.

However, according to EURACTIV.com, these EU import provisions do not envisage non-EU countries necessarily having similar legislation to the EU.

“These import provisions apply only to animals and animal products which are destined for exports into the EU. Non-EU countries can decide on modalities on how to ensure that exported goods will meet these requirements,” the spokesperson for European Commission was quoted as saying.

However, a number of non-EU countries have expressed their concerns about the application of AMR provisions on imports from third countries, and potential disruption effects of these provisions on global trade in animals or products of animal origin .

They also claimed that this could violate the EU’s obligations under the WTO’s SPS Agreement (Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures).

Article details

  • Author(s)
  • M Djuric, DVM
  • Date
  • 09 July 2018
  • Source
  • EURACTIV.com
  • Subject(s)
  • Veterinary medicine