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News Article

Common disorders of Border Terriers


A study of over one thousand Border Terriers found periodontal disease, overweight/obesity and otitis externa are the most common disorders.

A Royal Veteirnary College VetCompass™ study aimed to characterise the demography and common disorders of Border Terriers receiving veterinary care in England using anonymised clinical data from hundreds of veterinary clinics.

The findings of the study, published in Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, highlight a decreasing trend in the popularity of Border Terriers from 1.46% of all puppies born in 2005 to 0.78% in 2014. The breed was relatively long-lived, with a median longevity of 12.7 years.

Of 1327 Border Terriers assessed that were under veterinary care during 2013, 881 (66.4%) had at least one disorder recorded during 2013. The most common disorders recorded were periodontal disease (17.63% of dogs) overweight/obesity (7.01%), otitis externa (6.71%), overlong nails (5.28%), anal sac impaction (4.75%), and vomiting (4.37%). Predisposition to dental and neurological disease was suggested.

The authors say the results of their study provide a comprehensive evidence resource to support improved health and welfare within the breed.

Read article: Border Terriers under primary veterinary care in England: demography and disorders by Dan G. O’Neill, Elisabeth C. Darwent, David B. Church and Dave C. Brodbelt, published in Canine Genetics and Epidemiology (2017) 4:15, doi: 10.1186/s40575-017-0055-3

Article details

  • Date
  • 16 January 2018
  • Source
  • Royal Veterinary College
  • Subject(s)
  • Dogs, Cats, and other Companion Animals