Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Rubus rosifolius
(roseleaf raspberry)

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Datasheet

Rubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 08 February 2019
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Invasive Species
  • Host Plant
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Rubus rosifolius
  • Preferred Common Name
  • roseleaf raspberry
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Plantae
  •     Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •       Subphylum: Angiospermae
  •         Class: Dicotyledonae
  • Summary of Invasiveness
  • R. rosifolius is a shrub which occurs naturally in forest margins, disturbed areas, landslide-affected land, abandoned fields, pastures, and roadsides. This species can invade the understory of moist and montan...

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Rubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); habit, showing flowers and fruits. Polipoli, Maui, Hawaii, USA. December, 2004.
TitleHabit
CaptionRubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); habit, showing flowers and fruits. Polipoli, Maui, Hawaii, USA. December, 2004.
Copyright©Forest Starr & Kim Starr - CC BY 4.0
Rubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); habit, showing flowers and fruits. Polipoli, Maui, Hawaii, USA. December, 2004.
HabitRubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); habit, showing flowers and fruits. Polipoli, Maui, Hawaii, USA. December, 2004.©Forest Starr & Kim Starr - CC BY 4.0
Rubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); fruit and leaves. Makawao Forest Reserve, Maui, Hawaii, USA. April, 2003.
TitleFruit and leaves
CaptionRubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); fruit and leaves. Makawao Forest Reserve, Maui, Hawaii, USA. April, 2003.
Copyright©Forest Starr & Kim Starr - CC BY 4.0
Rubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); fruit and leaves. Makawao Forest Reserve, Maui, Hawaii, USA. April, 2003.
Fruit and leavesRubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); fruit and leaves. Makawao Forest Reserve, Maui, Hawaii, USA. April, 2003.©Forest Starr & Kim Starr - CC BY 4.0
Rubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); flower and fruit. Hana Hwy, Maui, Hawaii, USA. August, 2002
TitleFlower and fruit
CaptionRubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); flower and fruit. Hana Hwy, Maui, Hawaii, USA. August, 2002
Copyright©Forest Starr & Kim Starr - CC BY 4.0
Rubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); flower and fruit. Hana Hwy, Maui, Hawaii, USA. August, 2002
Flower and fruitRubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); flower and fruit. Hana Hwy, Maui, Hawaii, USA. August, 2002©Forest Starr & Kim Starr - CC BY 4.0
Rubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); ripe fruit and leaves. Honokowai Ditch Trail, Maui, Hawaii, USA. June, 2010.
TitleRipe fruit
CaptionRubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); ripe fruit and leaves. Honokowai Ditch Trail, Maui, Hawaii, USA. June, 2010.
Copyright©Forest Starr & Kim Starr - CC BY 4.0
Rubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); ripe fruit and leaves. Honokowai Ditch Trail, Maui, Hawaii, USA. June, 2010.
Ripe fruitRubus rosifolius (roseleaf raspberry, thimbleberry, olaa); ripe fruit and leaves. Honokowai Ditch Trail, Maui, Hawaii, USA. June, 2010.©Forest Starr & Kim Starr - CC BY 4.0

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Rubus rosifolius Sm.

Preferred Common Name

  • roseleaf raspberry

Other Scientific Names

  • Rubus comintanus Blanco
  • Rubus commersonii Poir.
  • Rubus glandulosopunctatus Hayata
  • Rubus hopingensis Y.C. Liu & F.Y. Lu
  • Rubus jamaicensis Blanco
  • Rubus minusculus H.L,v. & Vaniot
  • Rubus rosaefolius
  • Rubus rosifolius var. coronarius (Sims) Focke
  • Rubus rosifolius var. inermis Z.X. Yu
  • Rubus tagallus Cham. & Schltdl.
  • Rubus taiwanianus Matsum.

International Common Names

  • English: bramble-of-the-Cape; Mauritius raspberry; raspberry-bush; roseleaf bramble; rose-leaf bramble; thimbleberry; West Indian raspberry
  • Spanish: fresa; rosa de novia; rosa minadora
  • French: framboise; framboise marron; framboise pays; framboisier
  • Chinese: kong xin pao

Local Common Names

  • : frambuesa común; frambueso de Africa; zarza
  • Brazil: amora-vermelha; framboesa; morango-silvestre
  • Cuba: rosa de monte; rosa de novia; zarzamora
  • Lesser Antilles: fonbwez; frais; frez; wild raspberry

Summary of Invasiveness

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R. rosifolius is a shrub which occurs naturally in forest margins, disturbed areas, landslide-affected land, abandoned fields, pastures, and roadsides. This species can invade the understory of moist and montane forests, especially areas in natural and artificial openings in primary and secondary forests. It is included in the Global Compendium of Weeds (Randall, 2012) and it is also listed as invasive in Brazil, Tanzania, Puerto Rico, Cuba and Hawaii (see distribution table for details; Oviedo Prieto et al., 2012; I3N-Brazil, 2014; PIER, 2014; Rojas-Sandoval and Acevedo-Rodríguez, 2014). In St. Lucia and Hawaii, it can completely cover wet open areas and exclude native species (Motooka et al., 2003; Graveson, 2012). In Brazil, this species invades principally wet and sunny habitats with more than 1800 mm of mean annual precipitation, displacing desirable plants and interfering with passage and use of the land (I3N-Brasil, 2014). In Africa, it invades savanna, coastal bush, disturbed grassland, forest margins, roadsides and riverbanks (BioNET-EAFRINET, 2014). 

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Plantae
  •         Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •             Subphylum: Angiospermae
  •                 Class: Dicotyledonae
  •                     Order: Rosales
  •                         Family: Rosaceae
  •                             Genus: Rubus
  •                                 Species: Rubus rosifolius

Notes on Taxonomy and Nomenclature

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The family Rosaceae includes 90 genera and about 2520 species distributed world-wide but especially in the Northern hemisphere (Stevens, 2012). The genus Rubus includes approximately 750 species and is economically and ecologically important with fruit crops, ornamentals, invasive weeds, and in early forest succession (Alice and Campbell, 1999). Species within the genus Rubus exhibit tremendous morphological diversity including large, woody, upright species; delicate, semi-herbaceous, prostrate species; and climbing species with highly reduced leaf blades. Consequently Rubus is one of the most taxonomically challenging genera of flowering plants, and species circumscription is even more complicated by the occurrence of hybridization, polyploidy, and agamospermy (Alice and Campbell, 1999). 

Description

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R. rosifolius is an erect or spreading shrub, 1–3 m long. Branchlets grayish brown or dark reddish brown, terete, soft hairy or subglabrous, with straight to curved prickles and yellowish glands. Leaves imparipinnate, usually 5–7-foliolate; petiole 2–3 cm, petiolule of terminal leaflet 0.8–1.5 cm, lateral leaflets subsessile, petiolule and rachis with soft hairs and sparse, minute prickles, sometimes subglabrous, with yellowish glands; stipules linear or lanceolate to ovate-lanceolate, 0.8–1.2 cm × 1.5–3.5 mm, sparsely soft hairy; blade of leaflets ovate or ovate-elliptic to lanceolate, 4–7(–10) × 1.5–5 cm, both surfaces pilose, glabrescent, with yellow glands, abaxially with sparse, minute prickles along the midvein, base rounded, margin sharply incised doubly serrate or coarsely doubly serrate, apex acuminate. Inflorescences terminal or in leaf axils, 1- or 2-flowered; bracts linear or lanceolate, 5–9 mm, puberulous. Pedicel (1–)2–3.5 cm, with ± soft hairs and sparse, minute prickles, sometimes glandular. Flowers 2–3(–5) cm in diameter. Calyx abaxially soft hairy and glandular; sepals triangular-lanceolate or ovate-lanceolate, 0.8–1.2(–1.4) cm × 4–6 mm, apex long caudate. Petals white, oblong, narrowly obovate, or suborbicular, 0.8–1.5 × 0.8–1.2 cm, abaxially shortly hairy, base clawed, apex obtuse. Stamens many, shorter than petals;. Pistils to 2 mm, shorter than stamens; ovary glabrous, sometimes glandular; styles glabrous.. Aggregate fruit red, ovoid-globose or narrowly obovoid to oblong, 1–1.5 × 0.8–1.2 cm, glabrous, with few glands; pyrenes deeply foveolate (Flora of China Editorial Committee, 2014). 

Plant Type

Top of page Perennial
Seed propagated
Shrub
Woody

Distribution

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R. rosifolius is native to China and Taiwan, south through Indochina and Indonesia, the eastern coast of Australia, and to Mauritius, New Caledonia, the Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu (Francis, 2004; USDA-ARS, 2014). It is naturalized in Africa, Mexico, Central and South America, the West Indies and on many islands in the Pacific Ocean (see distribution table for details, Acevedo-Rodríguez & Strong, 2012; Davidse et al., 2014; PIER, 2014; PROTA, 2014). 

Distribution Table

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The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Continent/Country/RegionDistributionLast ReportedOriginFirst ReportedInvasiveReferenceNotes

Asia

CambodiaPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
ChinaPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-AnhuiPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
-FujianPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
-GuangdongPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
-GuangxiPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
-GuizhouPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
-HubeiPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
-HunanPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
-JiangxiPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
-ShaanxiPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
-SichuanPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
-YunnanPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
-ZhejiangPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
IndiaPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-SikkimPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
IndonesiaPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014
-Irian JayaPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014
-JavaPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014
-KalimantanPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014
-Nusa TenggaraPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014
JapanPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
LaosPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
MalaysiaPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014
-SabahPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014
-SarawakPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014
MyanmarPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
NepalPresentNative
PhilippinesPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
TaiwanPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
ThailandPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
VietnamPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2014

Africa

CameroonPresentIntroducedPROTA, 2014
KenyaPresentIntroducedBioNET-EAFRINET, 2014Naturalised
MadagascarPresentIntroduced Invasive Binggeli, 2003
MalawiPresentIntroducedPROTA, 2014
MauritiusPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014
MayottePresentIntroduced Invasive PIER, 2014
RéunionPresentIntroduced Invasive PIER, 2014
TanzaniaPresentIntroduced Invasive BioNET-EAFRINET, 2014
ZambiaPresentIntroducedPROTA, 2014
ZimbabwePresentIntroducedPROTA, 2014

North America

MexicoPresentIntroducedVillaseñor and Espinosa-Garcia, 2004Weed
USAPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-HawaiiPresentIntroduced Invasive Wagner et al., 1999

Central America and Caribbean

Costa RicaPresentIntroducedDavidse et al., 2014
CubaPresentIntroduced Invasive Oviedo Prieto et al., 2012
DominicaWidespreadIntroducedBroome et al., 2007Naturalised
Dominican RepublicPresentIntroducedAcevedo-Rodriguez and Strong, 2012Naturalised
El SalvadorPresentIntroducedDavidse et al., 2014
GrenadaWidespreadIntroducedBroome et al., 2007Naturalised
GuadeloupeWidespreadIntroducedBroome et al., 2007Naturalised
GuatemalaPresentIntroducedDavidse et al., 2014
HaitiPresentIntroducedAcevedo-Rodriguez and Strong, 2012Naturalised
HondurasPresentIntroducedDavidse et al., 2014
JamaicaPresentIntroducedAcevedo-Rodriguez and Strong, 2012Naturalised
MartiniqueWidespreadIntroducedBroome et al., 2007Naturalised
MontserratWidespreadIntroducedBroome et al., 2007Naturalised
NicaraguaPresentIntroducedDavidse et al., 2014
PanamaPresentIntroducedDavidse et al., 2014; Simão-Bianchini, 2014
Puerto RicoPresentIntroduced Invasive Rojas-Sandoval and Acevedo-Rodriguez, 2014
SabaPresentIntroducedAcevedo-Rodriguez and Strong, 2012Naturalized
Saint Kitts and NevisWidespreadIntroducedBroome et al., 2007
Saint LuciaPresentIntroduced Invasive Graveson, 2012Mildly invasive in man-made clearings
Saint Vincent and the GrenadinesWidespreadIntroducedBroome et al., 2007

South America

ArgentinaPresentIntroducedZuloaga et al., 2008Misiones, Tucaman
BrazilPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-Espirito SantoPresentIntroducedSimão-Bianchini, 2014
-GoiasPresentIntroducedSimão-Bianchini, 2014
-Mato Grosso do SulPresentIntroduced Invasive I3N-Brasil, 2014
-Minas GeraisPresentIntroducedSimão-Bianchini, 2014
-ParanaPresentIntroducedSimão-Bianchini, 2014
-Rio de JaneiroPresentIntroducedSimão-Bianchini, 2014
-Santa CatarinaPresentIntroduced Invasive I3N-Brasil, 2014
-Sao PauloPresentIntroducedSimão-Bianchini, 2014
ColombiaPresentIntroducedIdarraga-Piedrahita et al., 2011
VenezuelaPresentIntroducedHokche et al., 2008

Oceania

AustraliaPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-New South WalesPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014
-QueenslandPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014
-VictoriaPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014
French PolynesiaPresentIntroduced Invasive Florence et al., 2013
New CaledoniaPresentUSDA-ARS, 2014Listed as native and introduced. Also listed as invasive (MacKee, 1994)
Papua New GuineaPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014
Solomon IslandsPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014
VanuatuPresentNativeUSDA-ARS, 2014

History of Introduction and Spread

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R. rosifolius was probably introduced for its fruits and to be used as an ornamental (PROTA, 2014; USDA-ARS, 2014). In Hawaii, it was introduced in the 1880s from Jamaica (Motooka et al., 2003). Also by the 1880s, it appears in herbarium collections made on islands in the West Indies. For example, it was collected in 1880 in Dominica, in 1889 in St Vincent, and in 1892 in Guadeloupe (US National Herbarium collections). 

Risk of Introduction

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The risk of introduction of R. rosifolius is high. This species is often planted as an ornamental, medicinal plant, and for its edible fruits which are commercialized and consumed by humans (PIER, 2014; PROTA, 2014; USDA-ARS, 2014). Its fleshy fruits can also be easily dispersed by birds and rodents. Thus, once established, the likelihood of colonizing new habitats (mainly disturbed areas) is relatively high. 

Habitat

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R. rosifolius grows in moist and sunny areas up to 2200 m elevation. It can be found in disturbed areas, forest edges, forest gaps, and along roadsides (ISSG, 2010; PIER, 2014). In Hawaii, R. rosifolius is a common weed in disturbed mesic to wet forest (Wagner et al., 1999). In the Caribbean and Central America it grows in primary and secondary forests, land affected by landslides, abandoned fields, neglected pastures, and roadsides (Francis, 2004). In Brazil, it invades principally wet and sunny habitats with more than 1800 mm of mean annual precipitation (I3N-Brasil, 2014). 

Habitat List

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CategorySub-CategoryHabitatPresenceStatus
Terrestrial
 
Terrestrial – ManagedDisturbed areas Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Disturbed areas Present, no further details Natural
Rail / roadsides Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Rail / roadsides Present, no further details Natural
Urban / peri-urban areas Present, no further details Natural
Urban / peri-urban areas Present, no further details Productive/non-natural
Terrestrial ‑ Natural / Semi-naturalNatural forests Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Natural forests Present, no further details Natural
Natural grasslands Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Natural grasslands Present, no further details Natural
Scrub / shrublands Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Scrub / shrublands Present, no further details Natural

Biology and Ecology

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Genetics

The chromosome number reported for R. rosifolius is 2n= 14 (Thompson, 1997). There is evidence that this species hybridizes with the endemic species R. hawaiensis on the island of Maui in the Hawaiian archipelago (Randell et al., 2004).

Reproductive Biology and Phenology

In China, R. rosifolius produces flowers in March through May and fruits in June and July (Flora of China Editorial Committee, 2014). The species flowers and fruits throughout the year in continually moist areas of Puerto Rico and tropical Africa. Rubus species have perfect flowers which are pollinated by insects, particularly honey bees (Apis mellifera). Seeds can be produced by both selfing and by outcrossing processes (Francis, 2004).

R. rosifolius grows 1 m or more per year and lives about 1.5 years. New sprouts then arise to replace old ones and the plant lives on (potentially) for several years (Francis, 2004). Seeds have germination success of about 90% after 12 weeks (ISSG, 2010).

Environmental Requirements

R. rosifolius is moderately shade and drought intolerant and prefers moist fertile soils. It grows best in sunny areas with high precipitation (>1800mm annually) in tropical and subtropical habitats (PROTA, 2014). The species usually grows at moderate to high elevations and colonizes a variety of well-drained to poorly-drained soils (Francis, 2004). It is reported at elevations of around 2200 m in Tahiti and 1730 m in Hawaii (Wagner et al., 1999; PIER, 2014). 

Climate

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ClimateStatusDescriptionRemark
Af - Tropical rainforest climate Tolerated > 60mm precipitation per month
Am - Tropical monsoon climate Tolerated Tropical monsoon climate ( < 60mm precipitation driest month but > (100 - [total annual precipitation(mm}/25]))
As - Tropical savanna climate with dry summer Tolerated < 60mm precipitation driest month (in summer) and < (100 - [total annual precipitation{mm}/25])
Aw - Tropical wet and dry savanna climate Tolerated < 60mm precipitation driest month (in winter) and < (100 - [total annual precipitation{mm}/25])
Cs - Warm temperate climate with dry summer Preferred Warm average temp. > 10°C, Cold average temp. > 0°C, dry summers
Cw - Warm temperate climate with dry winter Preferred Warm temperate climate with dry winter (Warm average temp. > 10°C, Cold average temp. > 0°C, dry winters)

Rainfall

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ParameterLower limitUpper limitDescription
Mean annual rainfall10003500mm; lower/upper limits

Rainfall Regime

Top of page Bimodal
Uniform

Soil Tolerances

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Soil drainage

  • free
  • impeded
  • seasonally waterlogged

Soil reaction

  • acid
  • neutral

Soil texture

  • heavy
  • light
  • medium

Special soil tolerances

  • shallow

Means of Movement and Dispersal

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R. rosifolius spreads by seeds which are eaten by birds, people and other mammals such as rodents. In addition, R. rosifolius spreads vegetatively by suckers and stem roots whenever they come into contact with moist soil, which helps it to colonize new habitat (Francis, 2004; BioNET-EAFRINET, 2014; PIER, 2014; PROTA, 2014). 

Pathway Causes

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CauseNotesLong DistanceLocalReferences
DisturbanceGrows as a weed Yes Yes ISSG, 2010
Escape from confinement or garden escapePlanted as ornamental Yes Yes ISSG, 2010
FoodFruits and leaves are consumed by humans Yes Yes ISSG, 2010
Garden waste disposalSeeds Yes Yes ISSG, 2010
Habitat restoration and improvementIn Africa it has been planted for erosion control Yes Yes PROTA, 2014
Hedges and windbreaksOrnamental hedge Yes Yes PROTA, 2014
Landscape improvementPlanted as ornamental Yes Yes ISSG, 2010
Medicinal use Yes Yes ISSG, 2010
Nursery tradeCommercialised as ornamental Yes Yes ISSG, 2010

Pathway Vectors

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VectorNotesLong DistanceLocalReferences
ConsumablesFruits are often consumed by humans Yes Yes ISSG, 2010
Debris and waste associated with human activitiesSeeds and stem fragments escaped from gardens Yes Yes ISSG, 2010
LivestockFruits are often consumed by cattle Yes Yes ISSG, 2010

Impact Summary

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CategoryImpact
Cultural/amenity Positive and negative
Economic/livelihood Positive and negative
Environment (generally) Positive and negative
Human health Positive and negative

Environmental Impact

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In Hawaii, R. rosifolius threatens many native plants through overcrowding and competition (PIER, 2014). It is able to form dense thickets when adequate sunlight is available and it can also climb over other plants using hooks on the stems and prickles on the leaves. In Hawaii it also grows as a weed in pastures and natural areas, where it displaces desirable plants and interferes with passage and use of the land (Motooka et al., 2003). In Tanzania this species invades savanna, coastal bush, disturbed grassland, forest margins, roadsides and riverbanks displacing native vegetation (BioNET-EAFRINET, 2014). In Brazil, R. rosifolius grows forming dense thickets, displacing native plant species and forming barriers impeding the movements of native animals throughout the understory of invaded natural forests (I3N-Brasil, 2014).

Risk and Impact Factors

Top of page Invasiveness
  • Proved invasive outside its native range
  • Has a broad native range
  • Abundant in its native range
  • Highly adaptable to different environments
  • Is a habitat generalist
  • Tolerates, or benefits from, cultivation, browsing pressure, mutilation, fire etc
  • Pioneering in disturbed areas
  • Benefits from human association (i.e. it is a human commensal)
  • Long lived
  • Fast growing
Impact outcomes
  • Altered trophic level
  • Damaged ecosystem services
  • Ecosystem change/ habitat alteration
  • Loss of medicinal resources
  • Modification of nutrient regime
  • Modification of successional patterns
  • Monoculture formation
  • Reduced native biodiversity
  • Threat to/ loss of native species
Impact mechanisms
  • Competition - monopolizing resources
  • Competition - shading
  • Competition - smothering
  • Hybridization
  • Rapid growth
  • Rooting
  • Produces spines, thorns or burrs
Likelihood of entry/control
  • Highly likely to be transported internationally deliberately

Uses

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R. rosifolius produces edible fruits. Fruits can be made into jams, pies and preserves. Leaves are used in traditional medicine and are made into tea for the treatment of painful menstruation, childbirth, flu, and morning sickness. Aboriginal people in Australia used a decoction of the leaves of R. rosifolius as a traditional treatment for diarrhea. It has been used for regeneration of disturbed sites within its native range in Australia. The species is widely planted as an ornamental (Francis, 2004; BioNET-EAFRINET, 2014; PROTA, 2014). 

Uses List

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Environmental

  • Amenity
  • Boundary, barrier or support
  • Erosion control or dune stabilization

Human food and beverage

  • Fruits
  • Leaves (for beverage)

Medicinal, pharmaceutical

  • Traditional/folklore

Ornamental

  • garden plant
  • Potted plant
  • Propagation material

Prevention and Control

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R. rosifolius is sensitive to triclopyr ester in water and very sensitive to triclopyr ester in a plant oil carrier. Foliar applications of either 1% glyphosate or 1% triclopyr ester in water have been also reported for the control of this species (Motooka et al., 2003). 

References

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Acevedo-Rodríguez P, Strong MT, 2012. Catalogue of the Seed Plants of the West Indies. Smithsonian Contributions to Botany, 98:1192 pp. Washington DC, USA: Smithsonian Institution. http://botany.si.edu/Antilles/WestIndies/catalog.htm

Alice LA, Campbell CS, 1999. Phylogeny of Rubus (Rosaceae) based on nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region sequences. American Journal of Botany, 86(1):81-97

Binggeli P, 2003. Introduced and invasive plants. In: The Natural History of Madagascar [ed. by Goodman, S. M.\Benstead, J. P.]. Chicago, USA: University of Chicago Press, 257-268

BioNET-EAFRINET, 2014. East African Network for Taxonomy. Online Key and Fact Sheets for Invasive plants. http://keys.lucidcentral.org/keys/v3/eafrinet/weeds/key/weeds/Media/Html/index.htm

Broome R, Sabir K, Carrington S, 2007. Plants of the Eastern Caribbean. Online database. Barbados: University of the West Indies. http://ecflora.cavehill.uwi.edu/index.html

Davidse G, Sousa M, Knapp S, Chiang F, 2014. Saururaceae a Zygophyllaceae. Flora Mesoamericana [ed. by Davidse, G. \Sousa, M. \Knapp, S. \Chiang, F.]., Mexico: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

Flora of China Editorial Committee, 2014. Flora of China. St. Louis, Missouri and Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA: Missouri Botanical Garden and Harvard University Herbaria. http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=2

Florence J, Chevillotte H, Ollier C, Meyer J-Y, 2013. Base de données botaniques Nadeaud de l'Herbier de la Polynésie Française (PAP) (Botanical database of the Nadeaud Herbarium of French Polynesia). http://www.herbier-tahiti.pf

Francis JK, 2004. Wildland shrubs of the United States and its Territories: thamnic descriptions: volume 1. General Technical Report - International Institute of Tropical Forestry, USDA Forest Service, No.IITF-GTR-26: 830 pp

Graveson R, 2012. The Plants of Saint Lucia (in the Lesser Antilles of the Caribbean). The Plants of Saint Lucia (in the Lesser Antilles of the Caribbean). http://www.saintlucianplants.com

Hokche O, Berry PE, Huber O, 2008. Nuevo Catálogo de la Flora Vascular de Venezuela (New catalogue of the vascular flora of Venezuela). Caracas, Venezuela: Fundación Instituto Botánico de Venezuela, 860 pp

I3N-Brasil, 2014. Base de dados nacional de espécies exóticas invasora (National database of exotic invasive species). Florianópolis - SC, Brazil: I3N Brasil, Instituto Hórus de Desenvolvimento e Conservação Ambiental. http://i3n.institutohorus.org.br

Idárraga-Piedrahita A, Ortiz RDC, Callejas Posada R, Merello M, 2011. Flora of Antioquia. (Flora de Antioquia.) Catálogo de las Plantas Vasculares, vol. 2. Listado de las Plantas Vasculares del Departamento de Antioquia:939 pp

ISSG, 2010. Global Invasive Species Database (GISD). Invasive Species Specialist Group of the IUCN Species Survival Commission. http://www.issg.org/database

Motooka P, Castro L, Nelson D, Nagai G, Ching L, 2003. Weeds of Hawaii's Pastures and Natural Areas; an identification and management guide. Manoa, Hawaii, USA: College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, University of Hawaii

Oviedo Prieto R, Herrera Oliver P, Caluff MG, et al. , 2012. National list of invasive and potentially invasive plants in the Republic of Cuba - 2011. (Lista nacional de especies de plantas invasoras y potencialmente invasoras en la República de Cuba - 2011). Bissea: Boletín sobre Conservación de Plantas del Jardín Botánico Nacional de Cuba, 6(Special Issue 1):22-96

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Links to Websites

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WebsiteURLComment
GISD/IASPMR: Invasive Alien Species Pathway Management Resource and DAISIE European Invasive Alien Species Gatewayhttps://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.m93f6Data source for updated system data added to species habitat list.
Global Invasive Species Databasehttp://www.issg.org/database/welcome
Global register of Introduced and Invasive species (GRIIS)http://griis.org/Data source for updated system data added to species habitat list.
Plant Resources of Tropical Africahttp://www.prota.org

Contributors

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27/06/14 Original text by:

Julissa Rojas-Sandoval, Department of Botany-Smithsonian NMNH, Washington DC, USA

Pedro Acevedo-Rodríguez, Department of Botany-Smithsonian NMNH, Washington DC, USA

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