Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Sinapis arvensis
(wild mustard)

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Datasheet

Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 21 November 2019
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Invasive Species
  • Pest
  • Host Plant
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Sinapis arvensis
  • Preferred Common Name
  • wild mustard
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Plantae
  •     Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •       Subphylum: Angiospermae
  •         Class: Dicotyledonae

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flowering habit. Val Belluna, Italy. October 2006.
TitleFlowering habit
CaptionSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flowering habit. Val Belluna, Italy. October 2006.
Copyright©Enrico Blasutto/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 4.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flowering habit. Val Belluna, Italy. October 2006.
Flowering habitSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flowering habit. Val Belluna, Italy. October 2006.©Enrico Blasutto/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 4.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Inflorescence. Val Belluna, Italy. October 2006.
TitleInflorescence
CaptionSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Inflorescence. Val Belluna, Italy. October 2006.
Copyright©Enrico Blasutto/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 4.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Inflorescence. Val Belluna, Italy. October 2006.
InflorescenceSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Inflorescence. Val Belluna, Italy. October 2006.©Enrico Blasutto/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 4.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Leaf. June 2007.
TitleLeaf
CaptionSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Leaf. June 2007.
Copyright©Pancrat/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 3.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Leaf. June 2007.
LeafSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Leaf. June 2007.©Pancrat/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 3.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Inflorescence. Val Belluna, Italy. October 2006.
TitleInflorescence
CaptionSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Inflorescence. Val Belluna, Italy. October 2006.
Copyright©Enrico Blasutto/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 4.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Inflorescence. Val Belluna, Italy. October 2006.
InflorescenceSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Inflorescence. Val Belluna, Italy. October 2006.©Enrico Blasutto/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 4.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flowering habit. Johannes Fehring Promenade, Floridsdorf, Vienna. May 2019.
TitleFlowering habit
CaptionSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flowering habit. Johannes Fehring Promenade, Floridsdorf, Vienna. May 2019.
Copyright©Stefan Lefnaer (Stefan.lefnaer)/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 4.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flowering habit. Johannes Fehring Promenade, Floridsdorf, Vienna. May 2019.
Flowering habitSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flowering habit. Johannes Fehring Promenade, Floridsdorf, Vienna. May 2019.©Stefan Lefnaer (Stefan.lefnaer)/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 4.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flowering habit. Naturschutzgebiet Leutratal und Cospoth Nature Reserve, Thuringia, Germany. May 2007.
TitleFlowering habit
CaptionSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flowering habit. Naturschutzgebiet Leutratal und Cospoth Nature Reserve, Thuringia, Germany. May 2007.
Copyright©Mars 2002/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 3.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flowering habit. Naturschutzgebiet Leutratal und Cospoth Nature Reserve, Thuringia, Germany. May 2007.
Flowering habitSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flowering habit. Naturschutzgebiet Leutratal und Cospoth Nature Reserve, Thuringia, Germany. May 2007.©Mars 2002/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 3.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flower close-up. Marchfeldkanal, Floridsdorf, Austria. May 2020.
TitleFlower
CaptionSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flower close-up. Marchfeldkanal, Floridsdorf, Austria. May 2020.
Copyright©Stefan Lefnaer (Stefan.lefnaer)/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 4.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flower close-up. Marchfeldkanal, Floridsdorf, Austria. May 2020.
FlowerSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flower close-up. Marchfeldkanal, Floridsdorf, Austria. May 2020.©Stefan Lefnaer (Stefan.lefnaer)/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 4.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flower close-up. Marchfeldkanal, Floridsdorf, Austria. May 2020.
TitleFlower
CaptionSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flower close-up. Marchfeldkanal, Floridsdorf, Austria. May 2020.
Copyright©Stefan Lefnaer (Stefan.lefnaer)/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 4.0
Sinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flower close-up. Marchfeldkanal, Floridsdorf, Austria. May 2020.
FlowerSinapis arvensis (wild mustard); Flower close-up. Marchfeldkanal, Floridsdorf, Austria. May 2020.©Stefan Lefnaer (Stefan.lefnaer)/via Wikimedia Commons - CC BY-SA 4.0

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Sinapis arvensis L.

Preferred Common Name

  • wild mustard

Other Scientific Names

  • Brassica arvensis Kuntze/Rabenh.
  • Brassica kaber (DC.) L.C. Wheeler
  • Brassica kaber var. pinnatifida (Stokes) L.C.Wheeler
  • Brassica sinapistrum Boiss.
  • Sinapis orientalis L.
  • Sinapis schkuhriana Rchb.

International Common Names

  • English: California rape; charlock; yellow charlock
  • Spanish: mostaza de los campos
  • French: moutarde des champs; moutarde sauvage; sanve; sene
  • Russian: collejón
  • Portuguese: mostarda-dos-campos

Local Common Names

  • Germany: Acker- Senf
  • Italy: senape selvatica
  • Netherlands: Herik
  • Sweden: aakersenap

EPPO code

  • SINAR (Sinapis arvensis)

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Plantae
  •         Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •             Subphylum: Angiospermae
  •                 Class: Dicotyledonae
  •                     Order: Capparidales
  •                         Family: Brassicaceae
  •                             Genus: Sinapis
  •                                 Species: Sinapis arvensis

Distribution

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S. arvensis is widely naturalized and probably native only in the Mediterranean region.

Distribution Table

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The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Last updated: 25 Feb 2021
Continent/Country/Region Distribution Last Reported Origin First Reported Invasive Reference Notes

Africa

EgyptPresent
MoroccoPresent
TunisiaPresent

Asia

AfghanistanPresent
India
-PunjabPresent
IranPresent
IraqPresent
IsraelPresent
JordanPresent
LebanonPresent
PakistanPresent
SyriaPresent
TurkeyPresent

Europe

AustriaPresent
BelgiumPresent
BulgariaPresent
CzechiaPresent
DenmarkPresent
FinlandPresent
FrancePresent
GermanyPresent
GreecePresent
HungaryPresent
IcelandPresent
IrelandPresent
ItalyPresent
NetherlandsPresent
NorwayPresent
PolandPresent
PortugalPresent
RomaniaPresent
RussiaPresent
Serbia and MontenegroPresent
SpainPresent
SwedenPresent
UkrainePresent
Union of Soviet Socialist RepublicsPresent
United KingdomPresent

North America

CanadaPresent
-OntarioPresent
GuatemalaPresent
United StatesPresent
-AlaskaPresent

Oceania

AustraliaPresent
-TasmaniaPresent
New ZealandPresent

South America

ArgentinaPresent
BrazilPresent
-Distrito FederalPresent
-Rio de JaneiroPresent

Host Plants and Other Plants Affected

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Plant nameFamilyContextReferences
Beta vulgaris var. saccharifera (sugarbeet)ChenopodiaceaeMain
    Triticum aestivum (wheat)PoaceaeMain
      Vitis vinifera (grapevine)VitaceaeMain

        References

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        Tsialtas, J. T., Eleftherohorinos, I. G., 2011. First report of branched broomrape (Orobanche ramosa) on oilseed rape (Brassica napus), wild mustard (Sinapis arvensis), and wild vetch (Vicia spp.) in northern Greece. Plant Disease, 95(10), 1322. http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/loi/pdis doi: 10.1094/PDIS-06-11-0462

        Distribution References

        Abbad Andaloussi F, Bachikh J, 2001. Studies on the host range of Ditylenchus dipsaci in Morocco. Nematologia Mediterranea. 29 (1), 51-57.

        Aghajani M A, Safaei N, 2008. New hosts for sclerotinia stem rot of canola. Journal of Plant Pathology. 90 (1), 147. http://www.agr.unipi.it/sipav/jpp/index.html

        Altınok H H, 2013. Fusarium species isolated from common weeds in eggplant fields and symptomless hosts of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melongenae in Turkey. Journal of Phytopathology. 161 (5), 335-340. DOI:10.1111/jph.12074

        Asaad N Y, Kumari S G, Haj-Kassem A A, Shalaby A B A, Al-Shaabi S, Malhotra R S, 2009. Detection and characterization of Chickpea chlorotic stunt virus in Syria. Journal of Phytopathology. 157 (11/12), 756-761. DOI:10.1111/j.1439-0434.2009.01574.x

        CABI Data Mining, 2011. Invasive Species Databases.,

        CABI, Undated. Compendium record. Wallingford, UK: CABI

        CABI, Undated a. CABI Compendium: Status as determined by CABI editor. Wallingford, UK: CABI

        Chatzivassiliou E K, Boubourakas I, Drossos E, Eleftherohorinos I, Jenser G, Peters D, Katis N I, 2001. Weeds in greenhouses and tobacco fields are differentially infected by Tomato spotted wilt virus and infested by its vector species. Plant Disease. 85 (1), 40-46. DOI:10.1094/PDIS.2001.85.1.40

        Dąbkowska T, Sygulska P, 2013. Variations in weed flora and the degree of its transformation in ecological and extensive conventional cereal crops in selected habitats of the Beskid Wyspowy Mountains. Acta Agrobotanica. 66 (2), 123-136. DOI:10.5586/aa.2013.029

        Demİrcİ E, Gene T, 2009. Vegetative compatibility groups of Verticillium dahliae isolates from weeds in potato fields. Journal of Plant Pathology. 91 (3), 671-676. http://www.sipav.org/main/jpp/

        Ghahari H, 2017. New records of flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) from Iran. Acta Zoologica Bulgarica. 69 (4), 501-506. http://www.acta-zoologica-bulgarica.eu/downloads/acta-zoologica-bulgarica/2017/69-4-501-506.pdf

        Golnaraghi A R, Pourrahim R, Farzadfar S, Ohshima K, Shahraeen N, Ahoonmanesh A, 2007. Incidence and distribution of Tomato yellow fruit ring virus on soybean in Iran. Plant Pathology Journal (Faisalabad). 6 (1), 14-21. http://www.ansinet.org/ppj

        Hassannejad S, Ghafarbi S P, 2013. Weed flora survey of Tabriz wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) fields. Journal of Biodiversity and Environmental Sciences (JBES). 3 (9), 118-132. http://www.innspub.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/JBES-Vol3No9-p118-132.pdf

        Hazini F, Zamani A A, Sasakawa M, Rakhshani E, Torabi M, 2013. A contribution to the agromyzid leaf miners (Diptera: Agromyzidae) of Kermanshah, Iran. Journal of the Entomological Research Society. 15 (3), 101-107. http://www.entomol.org

        Kämpf I, Hölzel N, Kühling I, Kiehl K, 2016. Arable weed flora in the Western Siberian grain belt. In: Julius-Kühn-Archiv. [ed. by Nordmeyer H, Ulber L]. Quedlinburg, Germany: Julius Kühn Institut, Bundesforschungsinstitut für Kulturpflanzen. 76-83. http://pub.jki.bund.de/index.php/JKA/article/view/6209/5913

        Kök Ș, Kasap İ, Özdemİr I, 2016. Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) species determined in Çanakkale Province with a new record for the aphid fauna of Turkey. Türkiye Entomoloji Dergisi. 40 (4), 397-412. http://dergipark.ulakbim.gov.tr/entoted/article/view/5000199653/5000176936

        Korkmaz S, Tomitaka Y, Onder S, Ohshima K, 2008. Occurrence and molecular characterization of Turkish isolates of Turnip mosaic virus. Plant Pathology. 57 (6), 1155-1162. http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/120750193/HTMLSTART DOI:10.1111/j.1365-3059.2008.01902.x

        Kozłowska-Makulska A, Wejman M, Szyndel M S, 2007. Weeds as natural hosts of beet poleroviruses. Phytopathologia Polonica. 53-56. http://www.au.poznan.pl/ptfit

        Milanova S, Boneva P, Grigorova P, Valkova M, 2007. Weed survey in central north Bulgaria. In: European Weed Research Society, 14th EWRS Symposium, Hamar, Norway, 17-21 June 2007 [European Weed Research Society, 14th EWRS Symposium, Hamar, Norway, 17-21 June 2007.], [ed. by Fløistad E]. Doorwerth, Netherlands: European Weed Research Society. 217. http://www.ewrs-symposium2007.com

        Önelge N, Bozan O, Gök-Güler P, 2016. First report of Citrus yellow vein clearing virus infecting new natural host plants in Turkey. Journal of Plant Pathology. 98 (2), 373. http://www.sipav.org/main/jpp/index.php/jpp/article/view/3518/2187

        Reis A, Boiteux L S, 2010. Alternaria species infecting brassicaceae in the Brazilian neotropics: geographical distribution, host range and specificity. Journal of Plant Pathology. 92 (3), 661-668. http://www.sipav.org/main/jpp/volumes/0310/031010.pdf

        Stobbs L W, Greig N, Weaver S, Shipp L, Ferguson G, 2009. The potential role of native weed species and bumble bees (Bombus impatiens) on the epidemiology of Pepino mosaic virus. Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology. 31 (2), 254-261. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07060660909507599

        Tahira J J, Khan S N, 2017. Diversity of weed flora in onion fields of Punjab, Pakistan. Pakistan Journal of Weed Science Research. 23 (2), 245-253. http://www.wssp.org.pk/resources/images/paper/955QW1498306408.pdf

        Tsialtas J T, Eleftherohorinos I G, 2011. First report of branched broomrape (Orobanche ramosa) on oilseed rape (Brassica napus), wild mustard (Sinapis arvensis), and wild vetch (Vicia spp.) in northern Greece. Plant Disease. 95 (10), 1322. http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/loi/pdis DOI:10.1094/PDIS-06-11-0462

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