Cookies on CABI

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

Continuing to use www.cabi.org means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

Search this site
Sign up for the CABI e-zine Newsletter
Improving lives by solving problems in agriculture and the environment

Join in

We develop workable approaches to tackle major invasive species threats. We research and implement biological control programmes to deal with problematic invasive species which cause adverse detrimental effects where they are introduced.

Our projects

We deliver a range of research and development projects that are solving major invasive species problems around the world. 

Invasives and livelihoods

Join our awareness raising campaign. Sign up for updates on the latest research, news and information

Contact us

Whether you're a donor, engaged in policy, have a great project idea or want to learn more about our work, we'd love to hear from you:

Arne Witt with Opuntia stricta in Laikipia

Arne Witt

 Dick Shaw

Dick Shaw

 Sean Murphy

Sean Murphy

Biological control of brown marmorated stink bug

The brown marmorated stink bug is native to parts of East Asia and is invasive in the US, Canada and Switzerland. Here, it is a serious pest of many fruit trees, shrubs and other plants. Chemical control is often used but, with testing, parasitic wasps from China could be used in North America instead. So we want to determine what natural enemies... >>

Controlling wild ginger

Plants from the Hedychium genus are widely loved and cultivated as ornamentals but a few are threatening delicate ecosystems in Hawaii, New Zealand, the Macaronesian Archipelago (Azores, Madeira and the Canaries), Brazil, Australia and La Réunion. We are researching natural ways to manage the plants where they have become invasive, which involves... >>

Biological control of Himalayan balsam

Himalayan balsam has rapidly become one of the UK’s most invasive weed species. A lack of natural enemies allows it to successfully compete with native plants for space, light, nutrients and pollinators, reducing biodiversity and contributing to erosion. Traditional control methods are inadequate. This project involves identifying an insect or... >>

Managing invasive species in selected forest ecosystems of South East Asia

Invasive species are threatening forest habitats in South East Asia. They also indirectly affect the livelihoods of millions of people who depend on forests for food, commodities and energy. CABI and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), in collaboration with partners, have developed a project aimed at conserving globally important... >>

Woody weeds in East Africa

Many exotic trees and shrubs have been introduced into Africa and become destructive invasive species. They're reducing native biodiversity and limiting the livelihoods of those that live in rural communities. CABI is trying to mitigate these impacts in East Africa by generating and sharing knowledge on their effects and finding ways that they can... >>

Controlling pest pear in Laikipia

Pastoralists in northern Kenya are heavily dependent on livestock. Their lives are being devastated by the non-native cactus Opuntia stricta. This weed has invaded the last good grazing land and when livestock and wildlife eat its fruits the spines can cause infection and death. Chemical and mechanical control methods are expensive and... >>

Toolkits for invasive plants in Laikipia, Kenya

Many exotic plant species introduced to Laikipia County, Kenya, have escaped cultivation and threaten biodiversity. Little is currently known however, about the presence of invasive species or their impact. Without this type of information, it is unlikely that various stakeholders will take action to effectively manage this threat. This project... >>