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AbstractFull Text

The trumpet tree (Cecropia peltata) is a small weedy tree from humid tropical America, which was introduced to Africa around 1910. For half a century after introduction, the trumpet tree remained a welcome guest in West and Central Africa, spreading only very slowly, before it began to invade...

Author(s)
Binggeli, P.
Publisher
CABI, Wallingford, UK
Citation
Forest gaps in West Africa: a new frontier for an invasive pioneer, 2004, pp unpaginated
AbstractFull Text

Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), native to South America, but now an environmental and social menace throughout the Old World tropics, affects the environment and humans in diverse ways, which are due to its potential to grow rapidly and produce enormous amounts of biomass, covering extensive ...

Author(s)
Cock, M.
Publisher
CABI, Wallingford, UK
Citation
Problems caused by water hyacinth as an invasive alien species, 2004, pp unpaginated
AbstractFull Text

Melaleuca quinquenervia (the melaleuca tree or paper-bark tree) is native to Australia and Papua New Guinea and was introduced to Florida, USA, at the beginning of the twentieth century to provide a useful crop that would grow in an area subject to drought, flooding and periodic fires where little...

Author(s)
Buckingham, G. R.
Publisher
CABI, Wallingford, UK
Citation
Paper-bark tree alters habitats in Florida, 2004, pp unpaginated
AbstractFull Text

This paper briefly discusses the introduction of Prosopis species into Africa from their native America over the past 200 years. Although some are useful for fuel, fodder or erosion control, others have become invasive weeds. The first detailed study on the impacts (both positive and negative) of...

Author(s)
Pasiecznik, N.
Publisher
CABI, Wallingford, UK
Citation
The good, the bad and the thorny: impacts of Prosopis in Africa, 2004, pp unpaginated
AbstractFull Text

This paper presents a brief account of the first occurrence of Asian and African witchweed (Striga asiatica) in the USA in 1956 and the infestations that led to the eradication effort led by the USDA and involving other federal and state agencies, agribusiness and the general public. The Animal and ...

Author(s)
Eplee, R. E.
Publisher
CABI, Wallingford, UK
Citation
Co-ordination of witchweed eradication in the USA, 2004, pp unpaginated
AbstractFull Text

This paper briefly presents the potential pathways for spread of Chromolaena or Siam weed (Chromolaena odorata), including movement of equipment, farm stock, vehicles, machinery, contamination of seeds, backpackers camping in infested areas, and use of Tully River sand unsterilized in potting...

Author(s)
McFadyen, R.
Publisher
CABI, Wallingford, UK
Citation
Containment of the spread of chromolaena weed in Australia, 2004, pp unpaginated
AbstractFull Text

This paper describes how Chromolaena odorata occurrence and spread is monitored by the Department of Natural Resources, Mines and Energy in Australia. Focus is given on aerial (via helicopter) surveying and ground surveying. The importance of extension activities to increase awareness, as well as...

Author(s)
McFadyen, R.
Publisher
CABI, Wallingford, UK
Citation
Surveying for chromolaena weed infestations in Australia, 2004, pp unpaginated
AbstractFull Text

This paper briefly describes the measures taken to control Chromolaena or Siam weed (Chromolaena odorata) in Australia over a 10-year period. Aside from two chemicals registered for use against Siam weed, intensive weed management practices on sugarcane and banana plantations along the Tully River...

Author(s)
McFadyen, R.
Publisher
CABI, Wallingford, UK
Citation
Eradication programme for chromolaena weed in Australia, 2004, pp unpaginated
AbstractFull Text

This paper explains "Cinderella species" as plant species which were originally useful for timber, fuel or fodder plantations, but have since become widespread weedy invaders. It continues on to discuss that individuals and organizations from research and development community and private sectors...

Author(s)
Pasiecznik, N.
Publisher
CABI, Wallingford, UK
Citation
Cinderella species and what happens after midnight?, 2004, pp unpaginated
AbstractFull Text

This paper explains what makes ragworts (Senecio spp.) successful colonizers. It describes the suitability of their fruits for dispersal, particularly, the longevity of its fruits and their ability to survive long-distance transport by man and animals. The role of the wool-trade in their spread is...

Author(s)
Harris, S. A.
Publisher
CABI, Wallingford, UK
Citation
By fleeces and iron horses: anthropogenic dispersal of ragworts, 2004, pp unpaginated

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