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CABI Book Chapter

Invasive species and global climate change.

Book cover for Invasive species and global climate change.

Description

This book is part of the "CABI Invasive Series", which addresses all topics relating to invasive species, including biosecurity surveillance, mapping and modelling, economics of invasive species and species interactions in plant invasions. Aimed at researchers, upper-level students and policy makers, titles in the series provide international coverage of topics related to invasive species, includi...

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Chapter 20 (Page no: 326)

Adapting to invasions in a changing world: invasive species as an economic resource.

Management and policy decisions regarding biological invasions and other aspects of global change such as the changing climate have the potential to influence one another. Recently, interest in harvest as an invasive species management strategy has surged. Researchers have speculated about the potential positive (e.g. population and impact reduction, economic losses recouped through new profits) and negative (e.g. generation of economic incentives to encourage further introductions) consequences of such management strategies, but few experimental analyses exist despite the fact that real-world 'experiments' in harvesting invasive species continue to accrue. This chapter provides the first comprehensive list of the many ways humankind has adapted to the presence of invasive species through harvest and considers trends that emerge from this list. The spectrum ranges from collection of feral invasive populations to cultivation of potential invaders as crops, and harvested invasive species serve a variety of purposes ranging from biofuels to foods. The costs of invasion and benefit from harvest can be difficult to quantify, and this difficulty is compounded by the fact that costs and benefits are often incurred by different stakeholders. Climate and other aspects of global change accompanying invasive species harvest have rarely been taken into account, and the climate effects of invasive species harvest should become an explicit consideration of harvest strategies moving forward. Ecologists, economists, environmental managers and stakeholders must work together to ensure the successful and responsible application of ongoing harvests and to inform future efforts.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Introduction. Author(s): Dukes, J. S. Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 9) Communicating the dynamic complexities of climate and ecology: species invasion and resource changes. Author(s): Thompson, J. P. Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 22) Climate change and plant pathogen invasions. Author(s): Garrett, K. A. Thomas-Sharma, S. Forbes, G. A. Nopsa, J. H.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 45) Analysis of invasive insects: links to climate change. Author(s): Gutierrez, A. P. Ponti, L.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 62) Climate change, plant traits and invasion in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Author(s): Blumenthal, D. M. Kray, J. A.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 81) Non-native species in Antarctic terrestrial environments: the impacts of climate change and human activity. Author(s): Hughes, K. A. Convey, P.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 101) Synergies between climate change and species invasions: evidence from marine systems. Author(s): Sorte, C. J. B.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 117) Ragweed in Eastern Europe. Author(s): Makra, L. Matyasovszky, I. Deák, Á. J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 129) Climate change and alien species in South Africa. Author(s): Irlich, U. M. Richardson, D. M. Davies, S. J. Chown, S. L.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 148) Climate change and 'Alien Species in National Parks': revisited. Author(s): Stohlgren, T. J. Resnik, J. R. Plumb, G. E.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 169) Invasive plants in a rapidly changing climate: an Australian perspective. Author(s): Webber, B. L. Klinken, R. D. van Scott, J. K.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 198) Invasive species of China and their responses to climate change. Author(s): Li Bo Wei ShuJuan Li Hui Yang Qiang Lu Meng
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 219) Identifying invasive species in real time: early detection and distribution mapping system (EDDMapS) and other mapping tools. Author(s): Wallace, R. D. Bargeron, C. T.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 232) Global identification of invasive species: the CABI Invasive Species Compendium as a resource. Author(s): Diaz-Soltero, H. Scott, P. R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 240) The biogeography of invasive plants - projecting range shifts with climate change. Author(s): Bradley, B. A.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 253) Identifying climate change as a factor in the establishment and persistence of invasive weeds in agricultural crops. Author(s): DiTommaso, A. Zhong Qin Clements, D. R.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 271) Assessing and managing the impact of climate change on invasive species: the PBDM approach. Author(s): Gutierrez, A. P. Ponti, L.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 293) Climate, CO2 and invasive weed management. Author(s): Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 305) Early detection and rapid response: a cost-effective strategy for minimizing the establishment and spread of new and emerging invasive plants by global trade, travel and climate change. Author(s): Westbrooks, R. G. Manning, S. T. Waugh, J. D.

Chapter details

  • Author Affiliation
  • Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, USA.
  • Year of Publication
  • 2014
  • ISBN
  • 9781780641645
  • Record Number
  • 20143298962