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CABI Book Chapter

Biotechnology and plant disease management.

Book cover for Biotechnology and plant disease management.


This publication is divided into 4 sections that cover topics on: unravelling microbe-plant interactions for applications to disease management; molecular diagnostics of plant pathogens for disease management; enhancing resistance of plants to pathogens for disease management; and understanding microbial interactions to enhance disease management.


Chapter 5 (Page no: 109)

Mechanisms of plant virus evolution and identification of genetic bottlenecks: impact on disease management.

The majority of characterized plant viruses have RNA genomes. Genetic variability is a fundamental feature of RNA viruses. High mutation rates, recombination and reassortment are the three basic mechanisms that are responsible for the enormous genetic polymorphism and rapid evolution of RNA viruses. Mutations are most frequently introduced into the viral genome during the replication process due to the low fidelity of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. Recombination is a widespread phenomenon described in many plant viruses with both RNA and DNA genomes and is responsible for more profound changes within the viral genome (sequence deletion or insertion or strand exchange). Reassortment is also an important mechanism responsible for swapping or introducing a whole genomic segment of the viral genome, but is limited only to the segmented viruses. However, these three mechanisms are counterbalanced by selection and genetic bottlenecks which reduce the genetic variation of plant viruses in nature. Recently, genetic bottlenecks have been identified experimentally in plant virus populations during the systemic movement within the plant and horizontal transmission from plant to plant by aphid vectors.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Signal transduction pathways and disease resistant genes and their applications to fungal disease control. Author(s): Xing, T.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 16) Modulating quorum sensing and type III secretion systems in bacterial plant pathogens for disease management. Author(s): Yang, C. H. Yang, S.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 58) Application of biotechnology to understand pathogenesis in nematode plant pathogens. Author(s): Mitchum, M. G. Hussey, R. S. Davis, E. L. Baum, T. J.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 87) Interactions between plant and virus proteomes in susceptible hosts: identification of new targets for antiviral strategies. Author(s): Sanfaçon, H. Jovel, J.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 125) Molecular understanding of viroid replication cycles and identification of targets for disease management. Author(s): Owens, R. A.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 146) Molecular diagnostics of soilborne fungal pathogens. Author(s): Lévesque, C. A.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 165) Molecular detection strategies for phytopathogenic bacteria. Author(s): Boer, S. H. de Elphinstone, J. G. Saddler, G. S.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 195) Molecular diagnostics of plant-parasitic nematodes. Author(s): Perry, R. N. Subbotin, S. A. Moens, M.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 227) Molecular diagnostic methods for plant viruses. Author(s): Olmos, A. Capote, N. Bertolini, E. Cambra, M.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 250) Molecular identification and diversity of phytoplasmas. Author(s): Firrao, G. Conci, L. Locci, R.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 277) Molecular detection of plant viroids. Author(s): Singh, R. P.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 301) Application of cationic antimicrobial peptides for management of plant diseases. Author(s): Misra, S. Bhargava, A.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 321) Molecular breeding approaches for enhanced resistance against fungal pathogens. Author(s): Knox, R. E. Clarke, F. R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 358) Protein-mediated resistance to plant viruses. Author(s): Uhrig, J. F.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 374) Transgenic virus resistance using homology-dependent RNA silencing and the impact of mixed virus infections. Author(s): Ravelonandro, M.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 395) Molecular characterization of endogenous plant virus resistance genes. Author(s): Lanfermeijer, F. C. Hille, J.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 416) Potential for recombination and creation of new viruses in transgenic plants expressing viral genes: real or perceived risk? Author(s): Fuchs, M.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 436) Virus-resistant transgenic papaya: commercial development and regulatory and environmental issues. Author(s): Suzuki, J. Y. Tripathi, S. Gonsalves, D.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 462) Potential disease control strategies revealed by genome sequencing and functional genetics of plant pathogenic bacteria. Author(s): Charkowski, A. O.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 498) Molecular assessment of soil microbial communities with potential for plant disease suppression. Author(s): Elsas, J. D. van Costa, R.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 518) Enhancing biological control efficacy of yeasts to control fungal diseases through biotechnology. Author(s): Marchand, G. Clément-Mathieu, G. Neveu, B. Bélanger, R. R.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 532) Molecular insights into plant virus-vector interactions. Author(s): Rochon, D.