Cookies on CAB eBooks

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

Continuing to use www.cabi.org/cabebooks means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

CABI Book Chapter

Tourism management: analysis, behaviour and strategy.

Book cover for Tourism management: analysis, behaviour and strategy.

Description

This book provides in-depth empirical reports on specific topics within five general areas of tourism management and marketing: (1) scanning and sense making; (2) planning; (3) implementing; (4) evaluating actions/process and performance outcomes; and (5) administering. Offering descriptions, tools and examples of tourism management decision making, the book is useful for students in tourism and m...

Chapter 20 (Page no: 339)

Deconstructing destination perceptions, experiences, stories and internet search: text analysis in tourism research.

This chapter provides an overview of developments which have resulted in an increased availability of text data, thereby creating greater interest in analysing text in the context of tourism. The first section of the chapter discusses different approaches to text analysis. Specifically, the chapter compares and contrasts qualitative and quantitative text analysis. Next, the chapter describes computer-assisted approaches and presents various representational techniques. The second section introduces four case studies to illustrate the depth and breadth of applications of text analysis in tourism research. The first case study employs a causal mapping technique to assess the changing market structure as perceived by managers in incentive travel. The second case study uses a hermeneutic approach to interpret consumers' perceptions of memorable experiences at a Midwest destination in the USA. The third case study applies quantitative analytical techniques to compare the language people use to describe their dining experiences at different types of restaurants. The fourth and final case study uses search keywords to identify the nature of competition between European cities. The chapter concludes with a discussion on the growing significance of text analysis in tourism as well as several important research challenges yet to overcome.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Tourism management theory, research and practice. Author(s): Woodside, A. G. Martin, D.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 14) Travel motivation: a critical review of the concept's development. Author(s): Hsu, C. H. C. Huang SongShan
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 28) Culture's consequences on experiencing international tourism services and products: quantitative and qualitative fuzzy-set testing of an integrative theory of national culture applied to the consumption of behaviours of Asian, European and North American consumers. Author(s): Woodside, A. G. Ahn Inja
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 62) Grounded theory of international tourism behaviour: building systematic propositions from emic interpretations of Japanese travellers visiting the USA. Author(s): Martin, D.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 94) Tourist harassment and responses. Author(s): McElroy, J. L. Tarlow, P. Carlisle, K.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 107) Deconstructing backpacking. Author(s): Uriely, N.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 113) Tourism demand modelling and forecasting. Author(s): Song HaiYan Guo Wei
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 129) Market segmentation in tourism. Author(s): Dolnicar, S.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 151) Advanced topics in tourism market segmentation. Author(s): Bigné, E. Gnoth, J. Andreu, L.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 174) When tourists desire an artificial culture: the Bali Syndrome in Hawaii. Author(s): Rosenbaum, M. S. Wong, I. A.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 185) Advertising travel services to the business traveller. Author(s): Albers-Miller, N. D. Straughan, R. D. Prenshaw, P. J.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 197) Interpreting and managing special events and festivals. Author(s): Wooten, M. H. Norman, W. C.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 218) Theme park tourism and management strategy. Author(s): Milman, A.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 232) Tummy tucks and the Taj Mahal? Medical tourism and the globalization of health care. Author(s): Connell, J.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 245) Wine tourism and consumers. Author(s): Getz, D. Carlsen, J. Brown, G. Havitz, M.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 269) Complexity at sea: managing brands within the cruise industry. Author(s): Weaver, A.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 285) Internationalization and the hotel industry. Author(s): Johnson, C. Vanetti, M.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 302) Guests' meetings and hotel group room reservations. Author(s): Toh, R. S.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 318) Sport events and strategic leveraging: pushing towards the triple bottom line. Author(s): O'Brien, D. Chalip, L.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 358) Importance-performance analysis (IPA): confronting validity issues. Author(s): Beaman, J. Huan TzungCheng
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 378) Evaluating tourism management programmes: advancing a paradigm shift for achieving highly effective tourism destination management programmes and strategy performance audits. Author(s): Woodside, A. G. Sakai, M. Y.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 405) Tourist shopping villages: exploring success and failure. Author(s): Murphy, L. Moscardo, G. Benckendorff, P. Pearce, P.
Chapter: 24 (Page no: 424) Monitoring visitor satisfaction with destinations using expectations, importance and performance constructs. Author(s): Fallon, P.
Chapter: 25 (Page no: 459) Tourism's economic contribution versus economic impact assessment: differing roles for satellite accounts and economic modelling. Author(s): Dwyer, L. Forsyth, P. Spurr, R. Thiep Van Ho
Chapter: 26 (Page no: 470) Sustainability and tourism dynamics. Author(s): Johnston, R. J. Tyrrell, T. J.
Chapter: 27 (Page no: 493) Employee empowerment: a key to tourism success. Author(s): Timmerman, J. E. Lytle, R. S.